This is a recipe that requires a ton of patience. You would probably only consider making once or less than once a year so it's unlikely that an expert experience will develop quickly.

The slow cooking waiting for the endpoint marker and it taking so long naturally brings in doubt as to whether it's working or not. The temptation is to tweak it up a bit by raising the heat. The dish burns irrecoverably and you're dashed.

For that reason just hang in there. When the doubts really flood in that's when your conviction of success should cut in.

I wish you good luck and enjoy a great sense of achievement when it's prepared and being served to a very appreciative group of diners.


Ingredients:
  • 350 gm jaggery
  • 170 gm (6 oz or 1 1/2 sticks) butter
  • 480 ml (2 cups) cream
  • 2 Tbsp Golden Syrup
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Vanilla essence
  • Water as needed
  • 1 Tbsp poppy seeds
  • 240 ml (1 cup) Semolina

Method:
  1. Roast the semolina by spreading onto a baking sheet or frying pan and roast over moderate heat or under the grill for 5-10 minutes. Stir frequently until the semolina has turned golden brown.
  2. Make the Butterscotch sauce by adding the shaved jaggery and Golden Syrup into a 2 litre saucepan with a minimum amount of water. Heat over a low-moderate flame in a heavy bottomed saucepan. Stir with a wooden spoon until it melts. Allow it to continue cooking gently until it reaches a good golden brown and uniform colour. Don't be too eager to stop the cooking at first colour sign at the same time don't let it burn, keeping over a lowish flame reduces this risk considerably plus the virtue of patience. Undercooking is the single major reason for an un-convincing Butterscotchiness of the final product  
  3. Carefully add the butter and cream (it will boil up very actively) and whisk this rapidly until it's incorporated completely.  Remove from the heat and carefully add ½ tsp of salt and ¼ tsp of vanilla Essence. Mix well and taste.  Basically you keep adjusting the salt and vanilla tiny amounts at a time until you're happy with the Butterscotch flavour.
  4. Pour the semolina into another saucepan with 300 ml of water and mix with a whisk. Place on a low to moderate heat stirring continuously. When it boils drop the heat to absolute minimum and add the Butterscotch sauce. You still need to mix the contents and it will become thicker and thicker. At this stage it may be easier to use a wooden spoon rather than a whisk for the stirring. Continue to simmer very gently for 8-10 minutes until the mixture starts to clump together and comes away from the sides of the pan easily. Extra water may be added to the cooking mixture if it becomes too thick and hasn't as yet shown the signs of clumping and coming away from the pan edges.
  5. Lowest possible heat is important. To prevent burning of the semolina and also to prevent the burning of the butterscotch. Both are quite easily burned.
  6. Pour the mixture into a cake tin or an oven-proof dish, approximately 22cm (8 in) diameter, which greased with oil or butter. Level the surface, sprinkle the poppy seeds on the surface and place under a hot grill for 8-10 minutes until the top is golden and some cracks appear on the surface. Serve at room temperature with whipped cream.