This is a Laos sausage similar except for a variation in herbs. Here it has been cooked in a continuous coil and then cut.

Undoubtedly the best pork sausages are made with boar meat. In many countries because the boar is a protected species, farmed pork has replaced this and makes a fine substitute. If you have access to legal boar then substitute the boar meat for the pork.




Ingredients:
  • 2.25 kg (3½ lb) pork or (wild boar)
  • 570 gm (1¼ lb) pork fat
  • Juice of three limes
  • 35 grams (about 2 tablespoons plus a teaspoon) Kosher salt
  • 1 head chopped fresh garlic
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 cup finely shredded  ginger
  • 1/2 cup chopped thai basil
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro
  • 5-10 chopped Thai 'phrik chi fah'  green chillies
  • sausage casings
Method:
  1. Chop the meat and fat into chunks of about 2.5 cm (1 in) width, then mix the garlic, herbs and spices together and toss with the meat and fat.
  2. Chill the meat and fat until it is almost frozen by putting it in the freezer for an hour or so.
  3. Take out some hog casings and set in a bowl of very warm water.
  4. Grind through your meat grinder (you can use a food processor in a pinch, but you will not get a fine texture) using the coarse die. If your room is warmer than 20ºC (69 F), set the bowl for the ground meat into another bowl of ice to keep it cold.
  5. Add the lime juice and mix thoroughly either using your clean  hands. This is important to get the sausage to bind properly. Once it is mixed well, put it back in the fridge for 30 minutes or so.
  6. Stuff the sausage into the casings all at once. Twist off links by pinching the sausage down and twisting it, first in one direction, and then with the next link, the other direction. Or you could tie them off with butcher’s string. This should allow you to make 2 dozen individual sausages. If you plan to cook all the sausages at one time such as for a barbecue, then do as the Hmong and others do, just pre-form it as one long sausage and grill it in a coil configuration over low heat.
  7. Hang the sausages in a cool place for 4-8 hours (the colder it is, the longer you can hang them). If it is warm out, hang for one hour. Once they have dried a bit, put in the fridge until needed. They will keep for at least a week in the fridge.
  8. If you are freezing the sausages, wait a day before doing so. This will tighten up the sausages and help them keep their shape in the deep-freeze.
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