This is the true laap. The most commonly available and tried “laaps” are in fact not, a point that non-Luang Phrabang residents disagree on! These other laaps are probably goi or salad naam toks. Luang Phrabang laap is actually more like a pate made with roasted egg plants. It has a smoky flavor and I have never been able to find it in any restaurant in Laos other than at Houey Xai in Bokeo province at Arimid Guest House restaurant. This laap takes a couple of hours to prepare and is certainly worth the wait.  It is commonly a home prepared food.

The ingredients:

Duck, pork, beef or deer.
3 large round aubergines
One or two garlic corms
3 to 5 chillies
Salt, MSG


Method: 

(Let’s say Duck laap Luang Phrabang or “egg plant duck laap”)
One large duck.
The skin is stripped off and placed into a pot of water with some salt and MSG ( Not essential)
The meat is removed from the skeleton and chopped very finely and set aside.
The carcass is placed into the same pot with the skin and the offal. The pot is placed on the heat and the soup brought to boiling and held there for some time. More salt is added to prevent the soup from boiling over (a Lao trick)
Three large round aubergines are roasted in the red coals of a charcoal fire with a number of chilies and whole garlic plants. These are roasted until each becomes cooked. The aubergines should be soft the way through. An alternative would be to grill them on a griddle. The roasted vegetables are brushed free of the char and then mashed in a mortar until a homogeneous paste.
Small amounts of the boiling soup are added to lighten the mixture in the mortar.

The minced meat is quickly fried with a small amount of lard or oil in a pan but care is taken not to over-cook and harden the meat. This then is also pounded in a mortar and finally combined with the augergine, garlic and chili paste. More soup can be added to make it a workable mixture maybe even a little sloppy. The texture should be homogeneous and wet pate like. At this point a tablespoon or two of roasted sticky rice powder is added until the consistency of the mixture is most definitely like that of a French pate. 

The cooked skin and offal is sliced into strips about a half centimeter wide and maybe one to two centimeters in length. These are then added to the paste. The amount added is purely up to you.